Tag Archives: visualization

Proposal for new images for modular forms on the LMFDB

I recently gave a talk about different visualizations of modular forms, including many new visualizations that I have been developing and making. I have continued to develop these images, and I now have a proposal for new visualizations for modular forms in the LMFDB.

To see a current visualization, look at this modular form page. The image from that page (as it is currently) looks like this.

This is a plot on a disk model. To make sense of this plot, I note that the real axis in the upper-half-plane model is the circumference of the circle, and the imaginary axis in the upper-half-plane model is the vertical diameter of the circle. In particular, $z = 0$ is the bottom of the circle, $z = i$ is the center of the circle, and $z = \infty$ is the top of the circle. The magnitude is currently displayed — the big blue region is where the magnitude is very small. In a neighborhood of the blue blob, there are a few bands of color that are meaningful — but then things change too quickly and the graph becomes a graph of noise.

I propose one of the following alternatives. I maintain the same badge and model for the space, but I change what is plotted and what colors to use. Also, I plot them larger so that we can get a good look at them; for the LMFDB they would probably be produced at the same (small) size.

Plots with “Contours”

I have made three plots with contours. They are all morally the same, except for the underlying colorscheme. The “default” sage colorscheme leads to the following plot.

The good thing is that it’s visually striking. But I recently learned that this colorscheme is hated, and it’s widely thought to be a poor choice in almost every situation.

A little bit ago, matplotlib added two colorschemes designed to fix the problems with the default colorscheme. (sage’s preferences are behind — the new matplotlib default has changed). This is one of them, called twilight.

And this is the other default, called viridis. I don’t actually think this should be used, since the hues change from bright yellow to dark blue at complex-argument pi to negative pi. This gives the strong lines, which correspond to those places where the argument of the modular form is pi.Plots without Contours

I’ve also prepared these plots without the contours, and I think they’re quite nice as well.

First jet.

Then twilight. At the talk I recently gave, this was the favorite — but I hadn’t yet implemented the contour-plots above for non-default colorschemes.Then viridis. (I’m still not serious about this one — but I think it’s pretty).Note on other Possibilities

There are other possibilities, such as perhaps plotting on a portion of the upper half-plane instead of a disk-model. I describe a few of these possibilities and give examples in the notes from my last talk. I should note that I can now produce contour-type plots there as well, though I haven’t done that.

For fun, here is the default colorscheme, but rotated. This came about accidentally (as did so many other plots in this excursion), but I think it highlights how odd jet is.

Gathering Opinions

This concludes my proposal. I am collecting opinions. If you are struck by an idea or an opinion and would like to share it with me, please let me know, email me, or leave a comment below.

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Notes behind a talk: visualizing modular forms

Today, I’ll be at Bowdoin College giving a talk on visualizing modular forms. This is a talk about the actual process and choices involved in illustrating a modular form; it’s not about what little lies one might hold in their head in order to form some mental image of a modular form.1

This is a talk heavily inspired by the ICERM semester program on Illustrating Mathematics (currently wrapping up). In particular, I draw on2 conversations with Frank Farris (about using color to highlight desired features), Elias Wegert (about using logarithmically scaling contours), Ed Harriss (about the choice of colorscheme), and Brendan Hassett (about overall design choices).

There are very many pictures in the talk!

Here are the slides for the talk.

I wrote a few different complex-plotting routines for this project. At their core, they are based on sage’s complex_plot. There are two major variants that I use.

The first (currently called “ccomplex_plot”. Not a good name) overwrites how sage handles lightness in complex_plot in order to produce “contours” at spots where the magnitude is a two-power. These contours are actually a sudden jump in brightness.

The second (currently called “raw_complex_plot”, also not a good name) is even less formal. It vectorizes the computation and produces an object containing the magnitude and argument information for each pixel to be drawn. It then uses numpy and matplotlib to convert these magnitudes and phases into RGB colors according to a matplotlib-compatible colormap.

I am happy to send either of these pieces of code to anyone who wants to see them, but they are very much written for my own use at the moment. I intend to improve them for general use later, after I’ve experimented further.

In addition, I generated all the images for this talk in a single sagemath jupyter notebook (with the two .spyx cython dependencies I allude to above). This is also available here. (Note that using a service like nbviewer or nbconvert to view or convert it to html might be a reasonable idea).

As a final note, I’ll add that I mistyped several times in the preparation of the images for this talk. Included below are a few of the interesting-looking mistakes. The first two resulted from incorrectly applied conformal mappings, while the third came from incorrectly applied color correction.

Posted in Expository, Math.NT, Mathematics, sage, sagemath, sagemath | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment