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Sage Days 87 Demo: Interfacing between sage and the LMFDB

Interfacing sage and the LMFDB — a prototype

The lmfdb and sagemath are both great things, but they don’t currently talk to each other. Much of the lmfdb calls sage, but the lmfdb also includes vast amounts of data on $L$-functions and modular forms (hence the name) that is not accessible from within sage.
This is an example prototype of an interface to the lmfdb from sage. Keep in mind that this is a prototype and every aspect can change. But we hope to show what may be possible in the future. If you have requests, comments, or questions, please request/comment/ask either now, or at my email: david@lowryduda.com.

Note that this notebook is available on http://davidlowryduda.com or https://gist.github.com/davidlowryduda/deb1f88cc60b6e1243df8dd8f4601cde, and the code is available at https://github.com/davidlowryduda/sage2lmfdb

Let’s dive into an example.

In [1]:
# These names will change
from sage.all import *
import LMFDB2sage.elliptic_curves as lmfdb_ecurve
In [2]:
lmfdb_ecurve.search(rank=1)
Out[2]:
[Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + x*y = x^3 - 887688*x - 321987008 over Rational Field,
 Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + x*y + y = x^3 - x^2 + 10795*x - 97828 over Rational Field,
 Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + x*y + y = x^3 - x^2 - 2294115305*x - 42292668425178 over Rational Field,
 Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + x*y + y = x^3 - x^2 - 3170*x - 49318 over Rational Field,
 Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + y = x^3 + 1050*x - 26469 over Rational Field,
 Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + x*y = x^3 - x^2 - 1240542*x - 531472509 over Rational Field,
 Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + y = x^3 - x^2 + 8100*x - 263219 over Rational Field,
 Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + x*y = x^3 + 637*x - 68783 over Rational Field,
 Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + y = x^3 + x^2 + 36*x - 380 over Rational Field,
 Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + y = x^3 + x^2 - 2535*x - 49982 over Rational Field]
This returns 10 elliptic curves of rank 1. But these are a bit different than sage’s elliptic curves.

In [3]:
Es = lmfdb_ecurve.search(rank=1)
E = Es[0]
print(type(E))
<class 'LMFDB2sage.ell_lmfdb.EllipticCurve_rational_field_lmfdb_with_category'>
Note that the class of an elliptic curve is an lmfdb ElliptcCurve. But don’t worry, this is a subclass of a normal elliptic curve. So we can call the normal things one might call on an elliptic curve.

th

In [4]:
# Try autocompleting the following. It has all the things!
print(dir(E))
['CPS_height_bound', 'CartesianProduct',
'Chow_form', 'Hom',
'Jacobian', 'Jacobian_matrix',
'Lambda', 'Np',
'S_integral_points', '_AlgebraicScheme__A',
'_AlgebraicScheme__divisor_group', '_AlgebraicScheme_subscheme__polys',
'_EllipticCurve_generic__ainvs', '_EllipticCurve_generic__b_invariants',
'_EllipticCurve_generic__base_ring', '_EllipticCurve_generic__discriminant',
'_EllipticCurve_generic__is_over_RationalField', '_EllipticCurve_generic__multiple_x_denominator',
'_EllipticCurve_generic__multiple_x_numerator', '_EllipticCurve_rational_field__conductor_pari',
'_EllipticCurve_rational_field__generalized_congruence_number', '_EllipticCurve_rational_field__generalized_modular_degree',
'_EllipticCurve_rational_field__gens', '_EllipticCurve_rational_field__modular_degree',
'_EllipticCurve_rational_field__np', '_EllipticCurve_rational_field__rank',
'_EllipticCurve_rational_field__regulator', '_EllipticCurve_rational_field__torsion_order',
'_Hom_', '__add__', '__cached_methods', '__call__',
'__class__', '__cmp__', '__contains__', '__delattr__',
'__dict__', '__dir__', '__div__', '__doc__',
'__eq__', '__format__', '__ge__', '__getattribute__',
'__getitem__', '__getstate__', '__gt__', '__hash__',
'__init__', '__le__', '__lt__', '__make_element_class__',
'__module__', '__mul__', '__ne__', '__new__',
'__nonzero__', '__pari__', '__pow__', '__pyx_vtable__',
'__rdiv__', '__reduce__', '__reduce_ex__', '__repr__',
'__rmul__', '__setattr__', '__setstate__', '__sizeof__',
'__str__', '__subclasshook__', '__temporarily_change_names', '__truediv__',
'__weakref__', '_abstract_element_class', '_adjust_heegner_index', '_an_element_',
'_ascii_art_', '_assign_names', '_axiom_', '_axiom_init_',
'_base', '_base_ring', '_base_scheme', '_best_affine_patch',
'_cache__point_homset', '_cache_an_element', '_cache_key', '_check_satisfies_equations',
'_cmp_', '_coerce_map_from_', '_coerce_map_via', '_coercions_used',
'_compute_gens', '_convert_map_from_', '_convert_method_name', '_defining_names',
'_defining_params_', '_doccls', '_element_constructor', '_element_constructor_',
'_element_constructor_from_element_class', '_element_init_pass_parent', '_factory_data', '_first_ngens',
'_forward_image', '_fricas_', '_fricas_init_', '_gap_',
'_gap_init_', '_generalized_congmod_numbers', '_generic_coerce_map', '_generic_convert_map',
'_get_action_', '_get_local_data', '_giac_', '_giac_init_',
'_gp_', '_gp_init_', '_heegner_best_tau', '_heegner_forms_list',
'_heegner_index_in_EK', '_homset', '_init_category_', '_initial_action_list',
'_initial_coerce_list', '_initial_convert_list', '_interface_', '_interface_init_',
'_interface_is_cached_', '_internal_coerce_map_from', '_internal_convert_map_from', '_introspect_coerce',
'_is_category_initialized', '_is_valid_homomorphism_', '_isoclass', '_json',
'_kash_', '_kash_init_', '_known_points', '_latex_',
'_lmfdb_label', '_lmfdb_regulator', '_macaulay2_', '_macaulay2_init_',
'_magma_init_', '_maple_', '_maple_init_', '_mathematica_',
'_mathematica_init_', '_maxima_', '_maxima_init_', '_maxima_lib_',
'_maxima_lib_init_', '_modsym', '_modular_symbol_normalize', '_morphism',
'_multiple_of_degree_of_isogeny_to_optimal_curve', '_multiple_x_denominator', '_multiple_x_numerator', '_names',
'_normalize_padic_lseries', '_octave_', '_octave_init_', '_p_primary_torsion_basis',
'_pari_', '_pari_init_', '_point', '_point_homset',
'_polymake_', '_polymake_init_', '_populate_coercion_lists_', '_r_init_',
'_reduce_model', '_reduce_point', '_reduction', '_refine_category_',
'_repr_', '_repr_option', '_repr_type', '_sage_',
'_scale_by_units', '_set_conductor', '_set_cremona_label', '_set_element_constructor',
'_set_gens', '_set_modular_degree', '_set_rank', '_set_torsion_order',
'_shortest_paths', '_singular_', '_singular_init_', '_symbolic_',
'_test_an_element', '_test_cardinality', '_test_category', '_test_elements',
'_test_elements_eq_reflexive', '_test_elements_eq_symmetric', '_test_elements_eq_transitive', '_test_elements_neq',
'_test_eq', '_test_new', '_test_not_implemented_methods', '_test_pickling',
'_test_some_elements', '_tester', '_torsion_bound', '_unicode_art_',
'_unset_category', '_unset_coercions_used', '_unset_embedding', 'a1',
'a2', 'a3', 'a4', 'a6',
'a_invariants', 'abelian_variety', 'affine_patch', 'ainvs',
'algebra', 'ambient_space', 'an', 'an_element',
'analytic_rank', 'analytic_rank_upper_bound', 'anlist', 'antilogarithm',
'ap', 'aplist', 'arithmetic_genus', 'automorphisms',
'b2', 'b4', 'b6', 'b8',
'b_invariants', 'base', 'base_extend', 'base_field',
'base_morphism', 'base_ring', 'base_scheme', 'c4',
'c6', 'c_invariants', 'cartesian_product', 'categories',
'category', 'change_ring', 'change_weierstrass_model', 'cm_discriminant',
'codimension', 'coerce', 'coerce_embedding', 'coerce_map_from',
'complement', 'conductor', 'congruence_number', 'construction',
'convert_map_from', 'coordinate_ring', 'count_points', 'cremona_label',
'database_attributes', 'database_curve', 'db', 'defining_ideal',
'defining_polynomial', 'defining_polynomials', 'degree', 'descend_to',
'dimension', 'dimension_absolute', 'dimension_relative', 'discriminant',
'division_field', 'division_polynomial', 'division_polynomial_0', 'divisor',
'divisor_group', 'divisor_of_function', 'dual', 'dump',
'dumps', 'element_class', 'elliptic_exponential', 'embedding_center',
'embedding_morphism', 'eval_modular_form', 'excellent_position', 'formal',
'formal_group', 'fundamental_group', 'galois_representation', 'gen',
'gens', 'gens_certain', 'gens_dict', 'gens_dict_recursive',
'genus', 'geometric_genus', 'get_action', 'global_integral_model',
'global_minimal_model', 'global_minimality_class', 'has_additive_reduction', 'has_bad_reduction',
'has_base', 'has_cm', 'has_coerce_map_from', 'has_global_minimal_model',
'has_good_reduction', 'has_good_reduction_outside_S', 'has_multiplicative_reduction', 'has_nonsplit_multiplicative_reduction',
'has_rational_cm', 'has_split_multiplicative_reduction', 'hasse_invariant', 'heegner_discriminants',
'heegner_discriminants_list', 'heegner_index', 'heegner_index_bound', 'heegner_point',
'heegner_point_height', 'heegner_sha_an', 'height', 'height_function',
'height_pairing_matrix', 'hom', 'hyperelliptic_polynomials', 'identity_morphism',
'inject_variables', 'integral_model', 'integral_points', 'integral_short_weierstrass_model',
'integral_weierstrass_model', 'integral_x_coords_in_interval', 'intersection', 'intersection_multiplicity',
'intersection_points', 'intersects_at', 'irreducible_components', 'is_atomic_repr',
'is_coercion_cached', 'is_complete_intersection', 'is_conversion_cached', 'is_exact',
'is_global_integral_model', 'is_global_minimal_model', 'is_good', 'is_integral',
'is_irreducible', 'is_isogenous', 'is_isomorphic', 'is_local_integral_model',
'is_minimal', 'is_on_curve', 'is_ordinary', 'is_ordinary_singularity',
'is_p_integral', 'is_p_minimal', 'is_parent_of', 'is_projective',
'is_quadratic_twist', 'is_quartic_twist', 'is_semistable', 'is_sextic_twist',
'is_singular', 'is_smooth', 'is_supersingular', 'is_transverse',
'is_x_coord', 'isogenies_prime_degree', 'isogeny', 'isogeny_class',
'isogeny_codomain', 'isogeny_degree', 'isogeny_graph', 'isomorphism_to',
'isomorphisms', 'j_invariant', 'kodaira_symbol', 'kodaira_type',
'kodaira_type_old', 'kolyvagin_point', 'label', 'latex_name',
'latex_variable_names', 'lift_x', 'lll_reduce', 'lmfdb_page',
'local_coordinates', 'local_data', 'local_integral_model', 'local_minimal_model',
'lseries', 'lseries_gross_zagier', 'manin_constant', 'matrix_of_frobenius',
'minimal_discriminant_ideal', 'minimal_model', 'minimal_quadratic_twist', 'mod5family',
'modular_degree', 'modular_form', 'modular_parametrization', 'modular_symbol',
'modular_symbol_numerical', 'modular_symbol_space', 'multiplication_by_m', 'multiplication_by_m_isogeny',
'multiplicity', 'mwrank', 'mwrank_curve', 'neighborhood',
'newform', 'ngens', 'non_minimal_primes', 'nth_iterate',
'objgen', 'objgens', 'optimal_curve', 'orbit',
'ordinary_model', 'ordinary_primes', 'padic_E2', 'padic_height',
'padic_height_pairing_matrix', 'padic_height_via_multiply', 'padic_lseries', 'padic_regulator',
'padic_sigma', 'padic_sigma_truncated', 'parent', 'pari_curve',
'pari_mincurve', 'period_lattice', 'plane_projection', 'plot',
'point', 'point_homset', 'point_search', 'point_set',
'pollack_stevens_modular_symbol', 'preimage', 'projection', 'prove_BSD',
'q_eigenform', 'q_expansion', 'quadratic_transform', 'quadratic_twist',
'quartic_twist', 'rank', 'rank_bound', 'rank_bounds',
'rational_parameterization', 'rational_points', 'real_components', 'reduce',
'reduction', 'register_action', 'register_coercion', 'register_conversion',
'register_embedding', 'regulator', 'regulator_of_points', 'rename',
'reset_name', 'root_number', 'rst_transform', 'satisfies_heegner_hypothesis',
'saturation', 'save', 'scale_curve', 'selmer_rank',
'sextic_twist', 'sha', 'short_weierstrass_model', 'silverman_height_bound',
'simon_two_descent', 'singular_points', 'singular_subscheme', 'some_elements',
'specialization', 'structure_morphism', 'supersingular_primes', 'tamagawa_exponent',
'tamagawa_number', 'tamagawa_number_old', 'tamagawa_numbers', 'tamagawa_product',
'tamagawa_product_bsd', 'tangents', 'tate_curve', 'three_selmer_rank',
'torsion_order', 'torsion_points', 'torsion_polynomial', 'torsion_subgroup',
'two_descent', 'two_descent_simon', 'two_division_polynomial', 'two_torsion_rank',
'union', 'variable_name', 'variable_names', 'weierstrass_p',
'weil_restriction', 'zeta_series']
All the things
This gives quick access to some data that is not stored within the LMFDB, but which is relatively quickly computable. For example,

In [5]:
E.defining_ideal()
Out[5]:
Ideal (-x^3 + x*y*z + y^2*z + 887688*x*z^2 + 321987008*z^3) of Multivariate Polynomial Ring in x, y, z over Rational Field
But one of the great powers is that there are some things which are computed and stored in the LMFDB, and not in sage. We can now immediately give many examples of rank 3 elliptic curves with:

In [6]:
Es = lmfdb_ecurve.search(conductor=11050, torsion_order=2)
print("There are {} curves returned.".format(len(Es)))
E = Es[0]
print(E)
There are 10 curves returned.
Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + x*y + y = x^3 - 3476*x - 79152 over Rational Field
And for these curves, the lmfdb contains data on its rank, generators, regulator, and so on.

In [7]:
print(E.gens())
print(E.rank())
print(E.regulator())
[(-34 : 17 : 1)]
1
1.63852610029
In [8]:
res = []
%time for E in Es: res.append(E.gens()); res.append(E.rank()); res.append(E.regulator())
CPU times: user 971 ms, sys: 6.82 ms, total: 978 ms
Wall time: 978 ms
That’s pretty fast, and this is because all of this was pulled from the LMFDB when the curves were returned by the search() function.
In this case, elliptic curves over the rationals are only an okay example, as they’re really well studied and sage can compute much of the data very quickly. On the other hand, through the LMFDB there are millions of examples and corresponding data at one’s fingertips.

This is where we’re really looking for input.

Think of what you might want to have easy access to through an interface from sage to the LMFDB, and tell us. We’re actively seeking comments, suggestions, and requests. Elliptic curves over the rationals are a prototype, and the LMFDB has lots of (much more challenging to compute) data. There is data on the LMFDB that is simply not accessible from within sage.
email: david@lowryduda.com, or post an issue on https://github.com/LMFDB/lmfdb/issues

Now let’s describe what’s going on under the hood a little bit

There is an API for the LMFDB at http://beta.lmfdb.org/api/. This API is a bit green, and we will change certain aspects of it to behave better in the future. A call to the API looks like

http://beta.lmfdb.org/api/elliptic_curves/curves/?rank=i1&conductor=i11050

The result is a large mess of data, which can be exported as json and parsed.
But that’s hard, and the resulting data are not sage objects. They are just strings or ints, and these require time and thought to parse.
So we created a module in sage that writes the API call and parses the output back into sage objects. The 22 curves given by the above API call are the same 22 curves returned by this call:

In [9]:
Es = lmfdb_ecurve.search(rank=1, conductor=11050, max_items=25)
print(len(Es))
E = Es[0]
22
The total functionality of this search function is visible from its current documentation.

In [10]:
# Execute this cell for the documentation
print(lmfdb_ecurve.search.__doc__)
    Search the LMFDB for an elliptic curve.

    Note that all inputs are optional, but at least one input is necessary.

    INPUT:

    -  ``label=l`` -- a string ``l`` representing a label in the LMFDB.

    -  ``degree=d`` -- an int ``d`` giving the minimum degree of a
       parameterization of the modular curve

    -  ``conductor=c`` -- an int ``c`` giving the conductor of the curve

    -  ``min_conductor=mc`` -- an int ``mc`` giving a lower bound on the
       conductor for desired curves

    -  ``max_conductor=mc`` -- an int ``mc`` giving an upper bound on the
       conductor for desired curves

    -  ``torsion_order=t`` -- an int ``t`` giving the order of the torsion
       subgroup of the curve

    -  ``rank=r`` -- an int ``r`` giving the rank of the curve

    -  ``regulator=f`` -- a float ``f`` giving the regulator of the curve

    -  ``max_items=m`` -- an int ``m`` (default: 10, max: 100) indicating the
       maximum number of results to return

    -  ``base_item=b`` -- an int ``b`` (default: 0) specifying where to start
       returning values from. The search will begin by returning the ``b``th
       curve. Combined with ``max_items`` to return data in chunks.

    -  ``sort=s`` -- a string ``s`` specifying what database field to sort the
       results on. See the LMFDB api for more info.

    EXAMPLES::

        sage: Es = search(conductor=11050, rank=2)
        [Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + x*y = x^3 - x^2 - 442*x + 1716 over Rational Field, Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + x*y = x^3 - x^2 + 1558*x + 11716 over Rational Field]
        sage: E = E[0]
        sage: E.conductor()
        11050
    
In [11]:
# So, for instance, one could perform the following search, finding a unique elliptic curve
lmfdb_ecurve.search(rank=2, torsion_order=3, degree=4608)
Out[11]:
[Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + y = x^3 + x^2 - 5155*x + 140756 over Rational Field]

What if there are no curves?

If there are no curves satisfying the search criteria, then a message is displayed and that’s that. These searches may take a couple of seconds to complete.
For example, no elliptic curve in the database has rank 5.

In [12]:
lmfdb_ecurve.search(rank=5)
No fields were found satisfying input criteria.

How does one step through the data?

Right now, at most 100 curves are returned in a single API call. This is the limit even from directly querying the API. But one can pass in the argument base_item (the name will probably change… to skip? or perhaps to offset?) to start returning at the base_itemth element.

In [13]:
from pprint import pprint
pprint(lmfdb_ecurve.search(rank=1, max_items=3))              # The last item in this list
print('')
pprint(lmfdb_ecurve.search(rank=1, max_items=3, base_item=2)) # should be the first item in this list
[Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + x*y = x^3 - 887688*x - 321987008 over Rational Field,
 Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + x*y + y = x^3 - x^2 + 10795*x - 97828 over Rational Field,
 Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + x*y + y = x^3 - x^2 - 2294115305*x - 42292668425178 over Rational Field]

[Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + x*y + y = x^3 - x^2 - 2294115305*x - 42292668425178 over Rational Field,
 Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + x*y + y = x^3 - x^2 - 3170*x - 49318 over Rational Field,
 Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + y = x^3 + 1050*x - 26469 over Rational Field]
Included in the documentation is also a bit of hopefulness. Right now, the LMFDB API does not actually accept max_conductor or min_conductor (or arguments of that type). But it will sometime. (This introduces a few extra difficulties on the server side, and so it will take some extra time to decide how to do this).

In [14]:
lmfdb_ecurve.search(rank=1, min_conductor=500, max_conductor=10000)  # Not implemented
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
NotImplementedError                       Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-14-3d98f2cf7a13> in <module>()
----> 1 lmfdb_ecurve.search(rank=Integer(1), min_conductor=Integer(500), max_conductor=Integer(10000))  # Not implemented

/home/djlowry/Dropbox/EllipticCurve_LMFDB/LMFDB2sage/elliptic_curves.py in search(**kwargs)
     76             kwargs[item]
     77             raise NotImplementedError("This would be a great thing to have, " +
---> 78                 "but the LMFDB api does not yet provide this functionality.")
     79         except KeyError:
     80             pass

NotImplementedError: This would be a great thing to have, but the LMFDB api does not yet provide this functionality.
Our EllipticCurve_rational_field_lmfdb class constructs a sage elliptic curve from the json and overrides (somem of the) the default methods in sage if there is quicker data available on the LMFDB. In principle, this new object is just a sage object with some slightly different methods.
Generically, documentation and introspection on objects from this class should work. Much of sage’s documentation carries through directly.

In [15]:
print(E.gens.__doc__)
        Return generators for the Mordell-Weil group E(Q) *modulo*
        torsion.

        .. warning::

           If the program fails to give a provably correct result, it
           prints a warning message, but does not raise an
           exception. Use :meth:`~gens_certain` to find out if this
           warning message was printed.

        INPUT:

        - ``proof`` -- bool or None (default None), see
          ``proof.elliptic_curve`` or ``sage.structure.proof``

        - ``verbose`` - (default: None), if specified changes the
           verbosity of mwrank computations

        - ``rank1_search`` - (default: 10), if the curve has analytic
          rank 1, try to find a generator by a direct search up to
          this logarithmic height.  If this fails, the usual mwrank
          procedure is called.

        - algorithm -- one of the following:

          - ``'mwrank_shell'`` (default) -- call mwrank shell command

          - ``'mwrank_lib'`` -- call mwrank C library

        - ``only_use_mwrank`` -- bool (default True) if False, first
          attempts to use more naive, natively implemented methods

        - ``use_database`` -- bool (default True) if True, attempts to
          find curve and gens in the (optional) database

        - ``descent_second_limit`` -- (default: 12) used in 2-descent

        - ``sat_bound`` -- (default: 1000) bound on primes used in
          saturation.  If the computed bound on the index of the
          points found by two-descent in the Mordell-Weil group is
          greater than this, a warning message will be displayed.

        OUTPUT:

        - ``generators`` - list of generators for the Mordell-Weil
           group modulo torsion

        IMPLEMENTATION: Uses Cremona's mwrank C library.

        EXAMPLES::

            sage: E = EllipticCurve('389a')
            sage: E.gens()                 # random output
            [(-1 : 1 : 1), (0 : 0 : 1)]

        A non-integral example::

            sage: E = EllipticCurve([-3/8,-2/3])
            sage: E.gens() # random (up to sign)
            [(10/9 : 29/54 : 1)]

        A non-minimal example::

            sage: E = EllipticCurve('389a1')
            sage: E1 = E.change_weierstrass_model([1/20,0,0,0]); E1
            Elliptic Curve defined by y^2 + 8000*y = x^3 + 400*x^2 - 320000*x over Rational Field
            sage: E1.gens() # random (if database not used)
            [(-400 : 8000 : 1), (0 : -8000 : 1)]
        
Modified methods should have a note indicating that the data comes from the LMFDB, and then give sage’s documentation. This is not yet implemented. (So if you examine the current version, you can see some incomplete docstrings like regulator().)

In [16]:
print(E.regulator.__doc__)
        Return the regulator of the curve. This is taken from the lmfdb if available.

        NOTE:
            In later implementations, this docstring will probably include the
            docstring from sage's regular implementation. But that's not
            currently the case.
        

This concludes our demo of an interface between sage and the LMFDB.

Thank you, and if you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please find me/email me/raise an issue on LMFDB’s github.
XKCD's automation

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An intuitive introduction to calculus

This is a post written for my fall 2013 Math 100 class but largely intended for anyone with knowledge of what a function is and a desire to know what calculus is all about. Calculus is made out to be the pinnacle of the high school math curriculum, and correspondingly is thought to be very hard. But the difficulty is bloated, blown out of proportion. In fact, the ideas behind calculus are approachable and even intuitive if thought about in the right way.

Many people managed to stumble across the page before I’d finished all the graphics. I’m sorry, but they’re all done now! I was having trouble interpreting how WordPress was going to handle my gif files – it turns out that they automagically resize them if you don’t make them of the correct size, which makes them not display. It took me a bit to realize this. I’d like to mention that this actually started as a 90 minute talk I had with my wife over coffee, so perhaps an alternate title would be “Learning calculus in 2 hours over a cup of coffee.”

So read on if you would like to understand what calculus is, or if you’re looking for a refresher of the concepts from a first semester in calculus (like for Math 100 students at Brown), or if you’re looking for a bird’s eye view of AP Calc AB subject material.

1. An intuitive and semicomplete introduction to calculus

We will think of a function $ {f(\cdot)}$ as something that takes an input $ {x}$ and gives out another number, which we’ll denote by $ {f(x)}$. We know functions like $ {f(x) = x^2 + 1}$, which means that if I give in a number $ {x}$ then the function returns the number $ {f(x) = x^2 + 1}$. So I put in $ {1}$, I get $ {1^2 + 1 = 2}$, i.e. $ {f(1) = 2}$. Primary and secondary school overly conditions students to think of functions in terms of a formula or equation. The important thing to remember is that a function is really just something that gives an output when given an input, and if the same input is given later then the function spits the same output out. As an aside, I should mention that the most common problem I’ve seen in my teaching and tutoring is a fundamental misunderstanding of functions and their graphs

For a function that takes in and spits out numbers, we can associate a graph. A graph is a two-dimensional representation of our function, where by convention the input is put on the horizontal axis and the output is put on the vertical axis. Each axis is numbered, and in this way we can identify any point in the graph by its coordinates, i.e. its horizontal and vertical position. A graph of a function $ {f(x)}$ includes a point $ {(x,y)}$ if $ {y = f(x)}$.

The graph of the function $ x^2 + 1$ is in blue. The emphasized point appears on the graph because it is of the form $ (x, f(x))$. In particular, this point is $ (1, 2)$.

Thus each point on the graph is really of the form $ {(x, f(x))}$. A large portion of algebra I and II is devoted to being able to draw graphs for a variety of functions. And if you think about it, graphs contain a huge amount of information. Graphing $ {f(x)= x^2 + 1}$ involves drawing an upwards-facing parabola, which really represents an infinite number of points. That’s pretty intense, but it’s not what I want to focus on here.

1.1. Generalizing slope – introducing the derivative

You might recall the idea of the ‘slope’ of a line. A line has a constant ratio of how much the $ {y}$ value changes for a specific change in $ {x}$, which we call the slope (people always seem to remember rise over run). In particular, if a line passes through the points $ {(x_1, y_1)}$ and $ {(x_2, y_2)}$, then its slope will be the vertical change $ {y_2 – y_1}$ divided by the horizontal change $ {x_2 – x_1}$, or $ {\dfrac{y_2 – y_1}{x_2 – x_1}}$.

The graph of a line appears in blue. The two points $ (0,1)$ and $ (1,3)$ are shown on the line. The horizontal red line shows the horizontal change. The vertical red line shows the vertical change. The ‘slope’ of the blue line is the length of the vertical red line divided by the length of the horizontal red line.

So if the line is given by an equation $ {f(x) = \text{something}}$, then the slope from two inputs $ {x_1}$ and $ {x_2}$ is $ {\dfrac{f(x_2) – f(x_1)}{x_2 – x_1}}$. As an aside, for those that remember things like the ‘standard equation’ $ {y = mx + b}$ or ‘point-slope’ $ {(y – y_0) = m(x – x_0)}$ but who have never thought or been taught where these come from: the claim that lines are the curves of constant slope is saying that for any choice of $ {(x_1, y_1)}$ on the line, we expect $ {\dfrac{y_2 – y_1}{x_2 – x_1} = m}$ a constant, which I denote by $ {m}$ for no particularly good reason other than the fact that some textbook author long ago did such a thing. Since we’re allowing ourselves to choose any $ {(x_1, y_1)}$, we might drop the subscripts – since they usually mean a constant – and rearrange our equation to give $ {y_2 – y = m(x_2 – x)}$, which is what has been so unkindly drilled into students’ heads as the ‘point-slope form.’ This is why lines have a point-slope form, and a reason that it comes up so much is that it comes so naturally from the defining characteristic of a line, i.e. constant slope.

But one cannot speak of the ‘slope’ of a parabola.

The parabola $ f(x) = x^2 + 1$ is shows in blue. Slope is a measure of how much the function $ f(x)$ changes when $ x$ is changed. Some tangent lines to the parabola are shown in red. The slope of each line seems like it should be the ‘slope’ of the parabola when the line touches the parabola, but these slopes are different.

Intuitively, we look at our parabola $ {x^2 + 1}$ and see that the ‘slope,’ or an estimate of how much the function $ {f(x)}$ changes with a change in $ {x}$, seems to be changing depending on what $ {x}$ values we choose. (This should make sense – if it didn’t change, and had constant slope, then it would be a line). The first major goal of calculus is to come up with an idea of a ‘slope’ for non-linear functions. I should add that we already know a sort of ‘instantaneous rate of change’ of a nonlinear function. When we’re in a car and we’re driving somewhere, we’re usually speeding up or slowing down, and our pace isn’t usually linear. Yet our speedometer still manages to say how fast we’re going, which is an immediate rate of change. So if we had a function $ {p(t)}$ that gave us our position at a time $ {t}$, then the slope would give us our velocity (change in position per change in time) at a moment. So without knowing it, we’re familiar with a generalized slope already. Now in our parabola, we don’t expect a constant slope, so we want to associate a ‘slope’ to each input $ {x}$. In other words, we want to be able to understand how rapidly the function $ {f(x)}$ is changing at each $ {x}$, analogous to how the slope $ {m}$ of a line $ {g(x) = mx + b}$ tells us that if we change our input by an amount $ {h}$ then our output value will change by $ {mh}$.

How does calculus do that? The idea is to get closer and closer approximations. Suppose we want to find the ‘slope’ of our parabola at the point $ {x = 1}$. Let’s get an approximate answer. The slope of the line coming from inputs $ {x = 1}$ and $ {x = 2}$ is a (poor) approximation. In particular, since we’re working with $ {f(x) = x^2 + 1}$, we have that $ {f(2) = 5}$ and $ {f(1) = 2}$, so that the ‘approximate slope’ from $ {x = 1}$ and $ {x = 2}$ is $ {\frac{5 – 2}{2 – 1} = 3}$. But looking at the graph,

The parabola $ x^2 + 1$ is shown in blue, and the line going through the points $ (1,2)$ and $ (2,5)$ is shown. The line immediately goes above and crosses the parabola, so it seems like this line is rising faster (changing faster) than the parabola. It’s too steep, and the slope is too high to reflect the ‘slope’ of the parabola at the indicated point.

we see that it feels like this slope is too large. So let’s get closer. Suppose we use inputs $ {x = 1}$ and $ {x = 1.5}$. We get that the approximate slope is $ {\frac{3.25 – 2}{1.5 – 1} = 2.5}$. If we were to graph it, this would also feel too large. So we can keep choosing smaller and smaller changes, like using $ {x = 1}$ and $ {x = 1.1}$, or $ {x = 1}$ and $ {x = 1.01}$, and so on. This next graphic contains these approximations, with chosen points getting closer and closer to $ {1}$.

The parabola $ x^2 + 1$ is shown in blue. Two points are chosen on the parabola and the line between them is drawn in red. As the points get closer to each other, the red line indicates the rate of growth of the parabola at the point $ (1,2)$ better and better. So the slope of the red lines seems to be getting closer to the ‘slope’ of the parabola at $ (1,2)$.

Let’s look a little closer at the values we’re getting for our slopes when we use $ {1}$ and $ {2, 1.5, 1.1, 1.01, 1.001}$ as our inputs. We get

$ \displaystyle \begin{array}{c|c} \text{second input} & \text{approx. slope} \\ \hline 2 & 3 \\ 1.5 & 2.5 \\ 1.1 & 2.1 \\ 1.01 & 2.01 \\ 1.001 & 2.001 \end{array} $

It looks like the approximate slopes are approaching $ {2}$. What if we plot the graph with a line of slope $ {2}$ going through the point $ {(1,2)}$?

The parabola $ x^2 + 1$ is shown in blue. The line in red has slope $ 2$ and goes through the point $ (1,2)$. We got this line by continuing the successive approximations done above. It looks like it accurately indicates the ‘slope’ of the parabola at $ (1,2)$.

It looks great! Let’s zoom in a whole lot.

When we zoom in, the blue parabola looks almost like a line, and the red line looks almost like the parabola! This is why we are measuring the ‘slope’ of the parabola in this fashion – when we zoom in, it looks more and more like a line, and we are getting the slope of that line.

That looks really close! In fact, what I’ve been allowing as the natural feeling slope, or local rate of change, is really the line tangent to the graph of our function at the point $ {(1, f(1))}$. In a calculus class, you’ll spend a bit of time making sense of what it means for the approximate slopes to ‘approach’ $ {2}$. This is called a ‘limit,’ and the details are not important to us right now. The important thing is that this let us get an idea of a ‘slope’ at a point on a parabola. It’s not really a slope, because a parabola isn’t a line. So we’ve given it a different name – we call this ‘the derivative.’ So the derivative of $ {f(x) = x^2 + 1}$ at $ {x = 1}$ is $ {2}$, i.e. right around $ {x = 1}$ we expect a rate of change of $ {2}$, so that we expect $ {f(1 + h) – f(1) \approx 2h}$. If you think about it, we’re saying that we can approximate $ {f(x) = x^2 + 1}$ near the point $ {(1, 2)}$ by the line shown in the graph above: this line passes through $ {(1,2)}$ and it’s slope is $ {2}$, what we’re calling the slope of $ {f(x) = x^2 + 1}$ at $ {x = 1}$.

Let’s generalize. We were able to speak of the derivative at one point, but how about other points? The rest of this post is below the ‘more’ tag below.

(more…)

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